Friday, 13 June 2014

Father's Day and a Divorce

As all divorced mums and dads know there are just some days during the year that are trickier emotionally than others. Pulling the big bag of generosity out of our depleted reserves is thus sometimes a whole lot tougher than others.

Here is a question, in this modern co-parenting and divorcing, married and distance managing family world of ours are we all subscribing to Father’s Day?

We know that there are more Fathers now staying at home.  They are more hands on helping, contributing to childcare and supporting the family fabric of our lives.  As well, the good intentions of Fathers are there in their thoughts and actions, despite the balance of the pressures of commuting, long working hours and increasing financial pressures. 

So the marketeering monkeys are all set with cards, chocolates, books and golf or fish style additions to give our Fathers the assurance of love and worthiness. Whether you believe in celebrating Father's Day or not is immaterial. It can be a wonderful, caring opportunity for separating or divorced families to help make things good

Is it entirely possible to leave your ego at the door of your aching heart and gift your kids the value of time and effort to show their appreciation for their Dad?  Does then Father's Day become a day to relent a little, forgive and extend respect to the Dad of your children?

Are you so very fortunate in your relationship with the children's Father, to be able to support your children with the acknowledgement of their Dad in whichever role and in whatever form that is?

Can divorce become a big 'Welcome to Real Fatherville' flag to Dads who perhaps haven't in the past paid so much attention to their children and can really start to get to know them. The very fact that Fathers will have one to one time in the future with their children will certainly enable the 'getting to know' the every nuance our children have.  Divorcing dads may have to learn to cook, iron, organise homework and sort out the bickering and truly understand how much emotional support is needed during childhood and those divorcing tough times. 

Is it not right then, if your children's Father is present in whatever shape or form in your children's lives that Father's Day should be given due credence and note?  Or maybe not if that fine human emotion of respect has been dragged kicking and screaming into the fear monkey's castle of sadness, which is divorce. Or that our children associate the celebration of Father's Day as a big, smack in the tummy reality that their Father is just not around. Thus questioning that he even cares and does he warrant any such attachment such as recognition, love and respect?

So is Father's Day a celebration of what is good about Dads? Or is it another opportunity for us all to realise the disparities between the monkey marketeers judgement and the reality of the modern family?

Could it just be that the simplicity is in the biological fact that he is their Dad. Fundamentally, it would seem that all children want to know is that the other parental half of what created them, in some way, could be acknowledged by his existence. That they are supported with the simple fact that their Dads are important in their lives.

I know that my children are happier for the respect I show towards their Dad. They are more relaxed and content that he is a part of their lives.  Their Father’s Day this year will be a positive for him, their relationship and future will be all the more productive and respectful.  The ability to support this special eternal relationship will be a reward for all, that kindness and love is the way forward.


Just now need to get organised, find the arts and crafts regalia for the cards and with it the proclamation of Dad love

With love Natasha

4 comments:

  1. hi,
    what a appreciable post. Father's day is really a special for everyone. great information. Thank you for sharing this post to us Gppr staffs. I definitely enjoying every little bit of it I have you bookmarked to check out new stuff you post nice post, thanks for sharing.
    thanks
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    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Veena for your lovely supportive comments. I have written a few posts since January 2014 which may interest you too covering all sorts of issues from mediation, positivity, children and fears. Have a look and I would love to hear any further comments you may have.

      With so many thanks Natasha

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  2. Heya! I'm at work surfing around your blog from my new
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    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey thanks for your lovely positive comment and hope you are still enjoying your iphone! Natasha

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